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How An Inadequate Background Check Will Lose You Money

If you type “background check” into your search bar, you’ll likely see some websites touting their free, fast screenings mixed in with trusted background check agencies. These free background check websites can look tempting—especially if you’re looking to cut costs—but looks can be deceiving. This can lead a company to perform an inadequate background check and potentially a bad hire.

In the case of background checks, not all screenings are equal. Organizations that offer inadequate screenings are all over the internet. And while the screenings themselves may be cheap, their shortcomings can have long-term consequences.

Before you jump into a background check system, consider investing in quality background checks. A reliable, comprehensive background check service will save you from the dangers of an inadequate background check. In this blog, we’ll explain the pitfalls of free screenings and how quality checks from companies like One Source can save you money in the long run.

Lack of Personalization

Every organization approaches screening differently. Before you commit to a background check plan, think about how many screenings you’ll need, what specific information you want in each report and how you’d like to manage screenings. Background checks aren’t as simple as typing an applicant’s Social Security number into a free database. Free screening sites will lead you to believe they provide comprehensive information, but they will not be able to tailor screenings to your needs. However, this will lead to an inadequate background check and possible bad hire for your company.

Most free screening sites only let you perform one screening at a time, offer no way to organize information and lack checks that may be essential to your business. All of these issues will waste your time and still leave you with insufficient information. 

One Source tailors your background checks to each position in your company, provides an easy-to-use dashboard to keep reports organized and always provides comprehensive data.

Dangers of a Bad Hire

At One Source, we work to give you extensive information so you can make the most informed hiring decisions. Hiring a reliable, trustworthy candidate will always be a safer investment than hiring someone you don’t know much about. 

Inadequate background checks will never quite give you all the data you need to make a confident decision. Your peace of mind is worth finding a dependable screening resource. For every bad hire, organizations lose money—more money than a quality background check might cost. Wasted onboarding time, benefits and equipment all add up to lost funds when you make a bad hire. High turnover rates also lower productivity and dampens morale. 

Before you choose a screening service, remember how your hiring choices can ripple across your company. Quality screenings increase your chance of quality employees, who will in turn increase your profitability. One Source can work with you to personalize your screening solutions and ensure you have everything you need to make the best hire. Check out our TotalCheck solutions to learn more about how we can work for you.

What does my HR team need to know about background checks on current employees?

Pre-employment background checks are a nearly universal HR practice. Organizations generally screen potential employees before they offer them a position. However, it can be helpful to occasionally run background checks on current employees.

By running background checks on your current employees, you can hold your team continuously accountable. This also ensure your employees maintain company values. Each organization requires a unique set of screening procedures, but you can tailor your recurring screenings to fit your needs.

Today, we’ll talk about why some companies screen their current employees. We’ll also discuss what you can do with the information from new background reports. One Source tailors screening solutions for your needs—we can help you determine how your HR team handles background checks.

Why do companies screen their current employees?

Pre-employment screenings help you ensure the new people you bring into your organization meet your expectations and will perform their jobs properly. After you hire your team members, however, it can be a good idea to perform occasional checks to make sure they’re still qualified to work with you.

This especially applies if your employees have to operate cars or machinery. To keep your organization safe, you can check your employees’ driving records periodically. By making sure they’re still in good standing and can safely operate machinery, you protect yourself from the consequences of any potential accidents. You can also run comprehensive backgrounds checks on all of your team to keep the most current information on them.

What can I do with the information from these background checks?

Your HR team likely has clear guidelines that explain what charges or violations will remove them from hiring consideration. When you’re hiring team decides not to hire an applicant because of the information in their background report, they are taking adverse action against the applicant. You must be able to back up your decision with your HR policy and specific parts of the applicant’s report.

For your current employees, you can create a termination policy based on your adverse action policy. By aligning these policies, you hold all current and potential employees to the same standards. If you re-screen your employees once a year, you can determine if they are still upholding the expectations of your organization and if they are qualified to complete their jobs. 

How can One Source help me?

At One Source, we offer solutions that make rescreening employees efficient and easy. Applicant Recheck allows you to instantly run a screening on your employees you’ve put in the One Source system. We also offer bulk background checks. To complete bulk checks, we’ll send you a spreadsheet to fill out, you’ll send it back securely and we can then run checks on your whole team at once. 

One Source can help you set up company-wide screenings at any frequency that makes the most sense for you. Reach out to our Client Relations team to learn more about how we can help you build the best screening process for you.

2020 Q3 FCRA Compliance Update

As we enter the fall of 2020, it is a good time to take a look at your company’s policies and processes. This new season will bring different challenges and opportunities for businesses. Whether you plan on hiring this fall or not, it’s always in your best interest to stay up to date with new FCRA compliance policies.

The first half of 2020 brought some policy changes in the world of hiring and screening. Here, we’ll cover some of the most prominent new FCRA compliance policies to keep your hiring practices compliant with state and local laws.

Salary History Bans

Recent measures have been taken that prevent employers from asking applicants about their salary history. They are intended to stop employers from basing their pay on previous compensation. In general, these bans seek to increase pay equity and ensure employees are paid fairly—regardless of any previous salary.

Maryland recently passed a version of salary history ban that includes additional expectations for employers. After October 1, 2020, employers must upon request provide applicants with a range of wages they expect to pay the person they hire. Employers cannot retaliate against an applicant for requesting pay information. Additionally, employers can’t use previous earnings as a baseline to set pay for new hires.

Toledo, Ohio and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania also each passed salary history bans in their local governments. Both bans went into effect in June 2020.

Ban-the-Box Laws

A ban-the-box law delays the time an employer can ask about an applicant’s criminal history. Instead of inquiring about criminal history at the beginning of the hiring process, employers under ban-the-box laws must wait. A potential criminal record must be obtained later in the hiring process. Ban-the-box laws can also change the way an employer is allowed to respond to a candidate’s criminal record.

In Waterloo, Iowa, organizations with 15 or more employees cannot take adverse action against applicants based on arrests, pending charges or expunged records. They also cannot take adverse action against any criminal charge without a “legitimate business reason.” The new law in Waterloo defines a “legitimate business reason” as instances where a criminal record would pose a risk to other employees, the public or any vulnerable populations served by the business.

The communities of Suffolk County, New York and St. Louis, Missouri also just passed ban-the-box laws. Suffolk County’s law goes into effect on August 25, 2020. St. Louis’s ban-the-box ordinance will start on January 1, 2021.

Whether or not these new laws impact your business, they reflect trends that may spread to your community. As you develop plans and policies for the coming months, One Source will keep you updated on compliance laws and help you find screening solutions. Learn more about our tailored background check solutions here or get in touch with our Client Relations team.

Do expunged records show up on background checks?

When running a criminal record check on a potential employee, volunteer or contractor, you want to learn as much about them as possible. The contents of a criminal record can determine what positions an applicant can fill, or if they can secure a position at all. It makes sense that you want the most comprehensive information as you can find. This will of course help you make the best decisions for your organization. However, not all records are public. Under some circumstances, people can have criminal records sealed or expunged.  But do expunged records show up on background checks? Expunged charges are erased from the record entirely, and sealed records still exist but are inaccessible to the public.

Generally, sealed and expunged records will never appear on a background check. With the help of One Source, you can still make informed decisions about your applicants without sealed or expunged records. Here, we’ll explain what it means to get a record expunged or sealed. We’ll also discuss why those records won’t show up on a report and how you can maintain ethics while hiring.

What does it mean to get records expunged or sealed?

After a person is convicted with a crime, they may ask the court to remove that conviction from public record. If the court grants a request to expunge a conviction or arrest, all records of the event are completely erased. If the court decides to seal a record, then the record still exists, but it can only be accessed with a court order.

People try to remove records to get a fresh start after a difficult time or to move past a mistake. The records disappear to reinforce their commitment to starting over. Requests to erase or seal a record is reviewed by a court. This demonstrates that an outside party believes this person deserves a clean record.

Why don’t erased or sealed records show up in reports?

It is unethical for background check agencies to report on convictions that have been purposefully erased. This is why expunged records don’t show up on background checks. Individuals usually earn the right to get their records cleared, so it’s not fair to report on crimes that the court deemed erasable.

Just because it’s unethical to report on hidden records doesn’t mean it never happens, however. Courts will clear a record in their official system, but that record may still remain in the databases of some credit reporting agencies. This means an erased record could end up in a screening report on accident, which could harm an applicant’s chances of getting hired.

At One Source, we search real-time criminal records directly from the courts. This means we provide you the most current information on an individual or record. We want to give you the best understanding of who is applying for your organization while respecting the wishes of the court and the applicant. Sifting through criminal records can be tricky and pose ethical issues, but One Source has your back and will help you make the best choices. We can help you put together a screening plan that’s right for your organization—contact our Client Relations team today.

How to Streamline Remote Employee Onboarding

The shift to remote work has changed how many businesses keep employees engaged, informed, and connected to company culture. Creating a sense of connection can be particularly difficult for new employees who only know you through their computer screen. Through the pandemic and beyond, businesses must be able to adapt their onboarding process to sufficiently meet the demands of virtual work. HR teams can develop processes and experiences that allow new, virtual employees to feel welcome while keeping virtual hiring organized. Here are some remote employee onboarding tips to creating a straightforward, engaging process for your HR team.

Automate the Paperwork

So many parts of the hiring and onboarding process involve stacks of paperwork for both HR and the new hire. You can streamline this entire process for your HR team and new hire by automating the processes for background checks, I-9s, employee handbooks and other onboarding information. One Source’s online portal offers simplicity and organization that will align with your HR team’s workflow. This also gives them time to acquaint prospective hires with your company.

Other kinds of HR software can allow applicants to complete onboarding documents like direct deposit forms and Form I-9s. Form I-9s must be completed within three days of a new hire date. However, your team can start the process sooner. This can streamline the remote employee onboarding process and take some pressure off new employees. Your newest team members will be overwhelmed enough by learning about their new job remotely, so take any chance to automate paperwork and free time to focus on building a connection.

Keep Communicating

Just because face-to-face interviews are rare these days doesn’t mean your hiring mindset should shift much. You’re still trying to win over the best candidates. Maintain proper communication about scheduling and operations so your applicants and new hires. This lets them know they’re not out of sight, out of mind. Setting clear expectations about onboarding processes and being communicative makes new employees feel involved and valued.

To keep communication flowing between you and your new hires, you can seek feedback with surveys and quick meetings. The insight you gather from those who experience remote onboarding can help you improve your process and shine a light on ways you can make all new employees feel more welcome.

Remote hiring and onboarding require creativity, proactive communication and care. At One Source, we work to help you seamlessly navigate the changing hiring environment to make your applicants and newcomers feel welcome while supporting your HR team. Check out our screening solutions to see how One Source can help you build the screening process that fits your needs.

Motor Vehicle Record FAQs for Employers

In any organization, each employee has a unique set of tasks that require a unique set of skills. Some skills, such as driving, require a great deal of trust on the part of the employer. Executing that skill perfectly is essential to the well-being of the organization and the public. When a position requires a specific and important skill like driving, it makes sense to ensure the person you choose for the position has a consistent history of responsible driving. You can ensure that through a motor vehicle record check.

Hiring teams use motor vehicle record (MVR) reports to identify whether or not a candidate has a responsible driving record. Many jobs don’t require operating a car or machinery on behalf of the organization.  This means you don’t have to run a MVR check on everyone. Still, it’s in your best interest to check the driving records of anyone who might operate a vehicle while on the job. Here are some common questions about MVR reports.

What does a Motor Vehicle Record report tell me?

The information in a report might vary depending on your state and the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) that compiles the report, but generally you can expect the following  in a MVR:

  • Current license status (suspended, revoked, cancelled)
  • Past license statuses
  • License class
  • Accident reports
  • DUI convictions
  • Vehicular crimes
  • Traffic violations
  • Insurance lapses

Altogether, each of these pieces of information can help you decide whether or not any candidate is a responsible driver.

Should I check an employee’s MVR more than once?

Most places have rules that require you to check MVRs on a regular basis. The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) suggests that any employee who has to drive a vehicle for work, regardless of if the employer owns the vehicle, should have an MVR report completed at regular intervals.

For employers who fall under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, they must review each driving employee’s MVR every 12 months. They must also keep the MVR on file for three years. This ensures employees keep their clean driving record throughout their time working with you.

How do I get a MVR report and how long does it take?

One Source can take care of MVR reports for you as an extension of our TotalCheck package. TotalCheck includes all the criminal history and identity checks you expect of any background report, and you can add a DMV driver’s history check or a Department of Transportation screening. You can also run a standalone driving history search on a recurring basis, or ad it as an extension of your TC package. We can help you decide what kinds of checks make the most sense for you depending on your job requirements.

At One Source, we take a lot of pride in producing thorough, accurate background reports quickly and efficiently. We strive for a turnaround time of 24-48 hours. The speed at which we can compile an MVR depends on the rules and operating schedules of your local DMV, but we generally get MVRs back in a less than a couple of hours.

To start hiring drivers with confidence, contact the One Source Client Relations Team and build your MVR process today.

How to navigate the changing contractor hiring market.

Over the past few months on this blog, we’ve covered several aspects of how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted hiring. One perspective we have yet to cover is the influx of companies turning to contractor hiring and contingent workers.

Some industries are utilizing contractors through the pandemic because they might not know how many of their jobs will be truly permanent. Some industries are using contingent workers to complete tasks that arose suddenly during the pandemic and won’t be necessary later. Regardless of why your company might be hiring more contractors, it’s important to have a consistent screening process in place for temporary workers.

Contractors can deal with the same sensitive, proprietary information and have the same client interactions as full-time employees. To make your investment in contractors pay off, follow these tips for choosing contractors you can trust.

Set Consistent Expectations to help navigate contractor hiring

Despite the constraints of a crisis like the pandemic, you shouldn’t abandon your usual hiring practices. Maintaining consistency in screening expectations and hiring are key to avoiding unnecessary risk from a poor hire.

Apply the same screening standards to contingent workers as you would to any other employee. If you run drug tests or driving record checks on your full-time team, perform the same checks for temporary hires. Consistency will prevent headaches for your HR team and streamline your hiring so you can get the best contractors to work as quickly as possible.

Add a Few Contractor-Specific Guidelines

While your base screening process should be the same for contractors as it is for any other potential employee, you can add some screenings specific to contingent workers to amplify your background reports.

For one-off, temporary or contingent workers, you’ll follow approximately the same screening process you would follow for any other employee. You can include a few additional screenings such as drug screenings or driving records checks.

If you’re hiring a contractor, be aware that their staffing company will run their own background checks. You can let their staffing company know if you want any screenings or specific searches beyond their background checks. For vendors, construction workers or other workers who need access to your property, you can use One Source Certified Contractors (OSCC) checks to allow them access to your site. A school, for example, would use OSCC to find a contractor to fix their plumbing or renovate the school.

You can source contractors from staffing agencies who will run their own background checks for you. If you decide to hire any of the contractors full-time, you can then use your own screening process to vet them thoroughly before they become a full employee.

Whether you need several contingent workers quickly or want to spend some time finding the right person to handle a task for you, be sure to complete a proper screening before you give anyone access to your organization. One Source can help you screen all potential contractors so you can move forward. Contact our Client Relations Team to learn more about contractor screening.

One Source Background Check Resources Review: April-July 2020

At One Source, we provide comprehensive, transparent and useful background check education and resources on a weekly basis. We are experts in the screening industry, and we want everyone to have access to a categorized review of One Source’s background check resources to determine their security needs.

We will continue to curate blog posts and include them in this quarterly review of our blog. We’ll organize the blogs by topic to make it easier to find the information you need and utilize our knowledge when you need it. With that said, let’s dive into the One Source Background Check Resources Review.

Background Check Resources Review : General Background Check Information

Should social media checks be included in screenings?

A job candidate’s social media accounts can provide a clear picture of their true behaviors and personality—and social media screenings can absolutely have a place in the hiring process. However, that screening should not be as simple as letting your hiring manager quickly scroll through a candidate’s profile(s). In this blog, we explain how you can ethically and seamlessly integrate social media checks into your hiring process.

How to maximize your investment in quality background checks

When done right, background checks drive success. But when done insufficiently, poor background checks can lead to serious difficulties. That’s why background checks should be considered as investments in the future of your organization. Here we’ll talk about how making the most of your investment in background checks strengthens your company and how you can avoid the hidden costs of inadequate screenings.

The state of the screening industry during the pandemic

This blog is from the first week of May, and we do have more current COVID-19 information on our site. However, this blog sets the baseline of the screening industry’s response to the pandemic and how the pandemic has impacted screening turnaround times and protocols.

Compliance and Ethics

Answering all of your Fair Credit Reporting Act and adverse action FAQs

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) guides the background check process for employers and offers privileges and rights to the candidates who undergo screenings. Complying with the FCRA is essential to hiring teams, and One Source can answer all your compliance questions and guide you through an ethical hiring process.

Can I ever run a background check without permission?

Technically, if you have someone’s full name, you could run a background check on them without their knowledge. However, that doesn’t mean you should. Ethically—and often legally—you should always obtain permission before screening anyone. In this blog, we dive into the rules, expectations and potential consequences of running background checks in different contexts.

New Compliance Laws You Should Know in 2020

Regardless of whether your company is hiring right now, new compliance laws will likely affect you down the road. So it’s best to stay one step ahead and be prepared when your business is ready to hire again. Here are some of the most important state and federal regulations about screening and hiring that have been passed in recent months.

Protesting and background screenings: Is your business prepared?

Thousands of people have been arrested in recent months due to petty infractions from protests. Many of these arrests are released without charges. It’s up to each organization to decide how to manage protest arrests in their hiring, but we have some guidelines to help you develop a process.

Employers & Hiring Departments

How a background check company can enhance your hiring process

Hiring is already complicated enough—you have to write the perfect job description, filter through resumes, organize interview times and screen your candidates. Background check companies like One Source can help streamline and enhance your hiring to take some weight off you and help you find the right candidate.

Recognizing and minimizing hiring bias with background checks

First impressions are important in the hiring process, but unconscious biases can incorrectly shape those initial meetings. Background checks and smart hiring practices are effective ways to minimize biases. Here, we discuss a few screening methods you can implement to make your hiring unbiased and successful.

How employers can safely bring employees back to the office

As offices slowly start to reopen and employees begin to return, employers are busy planning how to keep everyone safe once they’re back under one roof. Not only are employers tasked with safely bringing employees back, but also creating a secure environment for customers and clients. We have some insights from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to guide your reopening plans.

Managing the challenges and changes of remote hiring

Remote recruiting is tricky new territory for recruiters and job seekers alike. But sometimes in hiring, adaptability is the name of the game. Meeting applicants where they are and adjusting accordingly can help bring out the best candidates. That being said, remote hiring isn’t easy—here we explore a few challenges you may encounter and how One Source can help.

Should I screen my furloughed or laid off employees if they come back?

Whether employees were furloughed, laid off or worked from home, you will need to take a look at your new employee processes. With One Source’s help, businesses can determine whether it is necessary for them to screen furloughed employees.

Volunteer Organizations

Volunteer Screening Best Practices

If you’re considering volunteer screenings for the first time or increasing screening measures, you can follow One Source’s best practices. With a strong background check procedure, you can get your volunteers out to serve others quickly and safely.

One Source has an entire library of blogs, FAQs and more—covering every aspect of background checks. Review our other Background Check Resources Reviews on our blog for more useful tips and information. If you have any further questions about background screening or how One Source can assist you, contact our Client Relations team.

How COVID-19 impacts tenant screenings

There isn’t much about our daily lives the pandemic hasn’t impacted. And the housing industry is no exception. Property managers face potential for delinquent payments and apartment turnover as their tenants manage their own difficulties. The challenges become an endless cycle of waiting for the financial crisis to evolve to a more stable environment. What can potentially be lost in the shuffle is processes, or changes to them, for prospective tenants. Tenant screenings should certainly still remain a priority for property managers and owners.

Amending the FCRA During the Pandemic

As property managers screen potential tenants, it’s necessary to stay informed of changes impacting credit reports. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) in particular brings change to tenant screenings. When the CARES Act became law, federal and state government encouraged financial services companies to offer payment relief to consumers impacted by COVID-19.

However, the CARES act also triggered an amendment to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). If a consumer accepted assistance from their financial services companies, their account status is required to adjust accordingly. The assistance could range from deferring payments, making partial payments, modifying a loan or others. If a consumer participated, regardless of the aid, their account would be required to be adjusted from “delinquent” to “current” status. For consumers with delinquent accounts who elect not to accept the assistance, their status would remain.

How Does the Amended FCRA Impact Tenant Screenings?

Property managers have the opportunity to adjust how they screen a potential tenant. However, credit reports are imperative to gaining a better understanding about whether or not the tenant will consistently afford rent. Having a clear understanding of what information is provided can help property managers fill vacancies with greater confidence.

Consider the amended FCRA and how it could impact how you approve or disapprove tenant applicants. If an applicant accepted CARES assistance, consider their financial stability prior to the pandemic and now. While the current status is important, thinking long-term could paint a clearer picture of whether or not the tenant is a right fit. We can help identify the information needed to fully understand the financial information provided and its potential impact on your decisions.

One Source provides customizable tenant screening packages that, regardless of the depth of information gathered, can be turned around in 48 hours. As a leading background check solutions provider, we believe it’s our responsibility to know and understand current state and federal regulations, and help businesses determine what information is most valuable to their decision making. 

Managing the challenges and changes of remote hiring

Remote recruiting is tricky. It’s relatively new territory for recruiters and job seekers and it comes with different expectations, restrictions and rules. While not every company is hiring right now, those who are must adjust their processes.

But sometimes in hiring, adaptability is the name of the game. Meeting applicants where they are and adjusting accordingly can help bring out the best candidates, no matter how strange the hiring circumstances. The being said, remote hiring isn’t easy—here are a few challenges you may encounter and how One Source can help.

Hiring without meeting in person

Face to face interaction with candidates has been an essential part of the hiring process. By getting an applicant in your work environment and seeing how they interact with your team, you can tell a lot about how they’ll fit in to your staff. However, remote recruiting and hiring does not offer the luxury of in-person interviews. So how do we adapt?

One way to customize the hiring process for an online space is to lean on the technologies that you’re already using. Zoom, Google Meet and other video conferencing services are an easy way to connect face to face at any time. Generally through the hiring process, you may only speak with candidates a few times before you make a decision. These video chat apps make it easy to have more frequent conversations with applicants. You can invite them to chat with your whole team and develop a sense of their personality through shorter, more frequent conversations.

You can also lean on other hiring resources like background checks and work samples to better understand what a candidate is like. One Source’s online portal makes it easy to keep reports in one place and refer to them whenever necessary. So, despite the lack of in-person communication, online resources allow you to compile a relatively complete picture of who you’re interviewing.

Notice and address gaps in your hiring process

While unconventional, turning your hiring process on its head by moving it online can be a good way to identify gaps and issues in your typical hiring process. Remote hiring may intensify underlying inefficiencies and frustrations. Do you need to revise your application review process? Should you ask different questions and measure different skills? Does your screening process align with your objectives? You may find yourself asking any of these questions and more as you continue remote hiring.

Don’t be afraid to think on your feet as you navigate new hiring methods. While your team should always be aligned and intentional, there has never been a better time to try new things and solve problems in creative ways. Patching up inefficiencies in your hiring will make your staff stronger in the long run.

If you feel like your background check process isn’t working toward your goals, contact us at One Source and we’ll help you build a screening process tailored to your needs. Everyone is managing change right now, so we’re here to make your hiring that much easier.