Posts

Do expunged records show up on background checks?

When running a criminal record check on a potential employee, volunteer or contractor, you want to learn as much about them as possible. The contents of a criminal record can determine what positions an applicant can fill, or if they can secure a position at all. It makes sense that you want the most comprehensive information as you can find. This will of course help you make the best decisions for your organization. However, not all records are public. Under some circumstances, people can have criminal records sealed or expunged.  But do expunged records show up on background checks? Expunged charges are erased from the record entirely, and sealed records still exist but are inaccessible to the public.

Generally, sealed and expunged records will never appear on a background check. With the help of One Source, you can still make informed decisions about your applicants without sealed or expunged records. Here, we’ll explain what it means to get a record expunged or sealed. We’ll also discuss why those records won’t show up on a report and how you can maintain ethics while hiring.

What does it mean to get records expunged or sealed?

After a person is convicted with a crime, they may ask the court to remove that conviction from public record. If the court grants a request to expunge a conviction or arrest, all records of the event are completely erased. If the court decides to seal a record, then the record still exists, but it can only be accessed with a court order.

People try to remove records to get a fresh start after a difficult time or to move past a mistake. The records disappear to reinforce their commitment to starting over. Requests to erase or seal a record is reviewed by a court. This demonstrates that an outside party believes this person deserves a clean record.

Why don’t erased or sealed records show up in reports?

It is unethical for background check agencies to report on convictions that have been purposefully erased. This is why expunged records don’t show up on background checks. Individuals usually earn the right to get their records cleared, so it’s not fair to report on crimes that the court deemed erasable.

Just because it’s unethical to report on hidden records doesn’t mean it never happens, however. Courts will clear a record in their official system, but that record may still remain in the databases of some credit reporting agencies. This means an erased record could end up in a screening report on accident, which could harm an applicant’s chances of getting hired.

At One Source, we search real-time criminal records directly from the courts. This means we provide you the most current information on an individual or record. We want to give you the best understanding of who is applying for your organization while respecting the wishes of the court and the applicant. Sifting through criminal records can be tricky and pose ethical issues, but One Source has your back and will help you make the best choices. We can help you put together a screening plan that’s right for your organization—contact our Client Relations team today.

How to Streamline Remote Employee Onboarding

The shift to remote work has changed how many businesses keep employees engaged, informed, and connected to company culture. Creating a sense of connection can be particularly difficult for new employees who only know you through their computer screen. Through the pandemic and beyond, businesses must be able to adapt their onboarding process to sufficiently meet the demands of virtual work. HR teams can develop processes and experiences that allow new, virtual employees to feel welcome while keeping virtual hiring organized. Here are some remote employee onboarding tips to creating a straightforward, engaging process for your HR team.

Automate the Paperwork

So many parts of the hiring and onboarding process involve stacks of paperwork for both HR and the new hire. You can streamline this entire process for your HR team and new hire by automating the processes for background checks, I-9s, employee handbooks and other onboarding information. One Source’s online portal offers simplicity and organization that will align with your HR team’s workflow. This also gives them time to acquaint prospective hires with your company.

Other kinds of HR software can allow applicants to complete onboarding documents like direct deposit forms and Form I-9s. Form I-9s must be completed within three days of a new hire date. However, your team can start the process sooner. This can streamline the remote employee onboarding process and take some pressure off new employees. Your newest team members will be overwhelmed enough by learning about their new job remotely, so take any chance to automate paperwork and free time to focus on building a connection.

Keep Communicating

Just because face-to-face interviews are rare these days doesn’t mean your hiring mindset should shift much. You’re still trying to win over the best candidates. Maintain proper communication about scheduling and operations so your applicants and new hires. This lets them know they’re not out of sight, out of mind. Setting clear expectations about onboarding processes and being communicative makes new employees feel involved and valued.

To keep communication flowing between you and your new hires, you can seek feedback with surveys and quick meetings. The insight you gather from those who experience remote onboarding can help you improve your process and shine a light on ways you can make all new employees feel more welcome.

Remote hiring and onboarding require creativity, proactive communication and care. At One Source, we work to help you seamlessly navigate the changing hiring environment to make your applicants and newcomers feel welcome while supporting your HR team. Check out our screening solutions to see how One Source can help you build the screening process that fits your needs.

Motor Vehicle Record FAQs for Employers

In any organization, each employee has a unique set of tasks that require a unique set of skills. Some skills, such as driving, require a great deal of trust on the part of the employer. Executing that skill perfectly is essential to the well-being of the organization and the public. When a position requires a specific and important skill like driving, it makes sense to ensure the person you choose for the position has a consistent history of responsible driving. You can ensure that through a motor vehicle record check.

Hiring teams use motor vehicle record (MVR) reports to identify whether or not a candidate has a responsible driving record. Many jobs don’t require operating a car or machinery on behalf of the organization.  This means you don’t have to run a MVR check on everyone. Still, it’s in your best interest to check the driving records of anyone who might operate a vehicle while on the job. Here are some common questions about MVR reports.

What does a Motor Vehicle Record report tell me?

The information in a report might vary depending on your state and the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) that compiles the report, but generally you can expect the following  in a MVR:

  • Current license status (suspended, revoked, cancelled)
  • Past license statuses
  • License class
  • Accident reports
  • DUI convictions
  • Vehicular crimes
  • Traffic violations
  • Insurance lapses

Altogether, each of these pieces of information can help you decide whether or not any candidate is a responsible driver.

Should I check an employee’s MVR more than once?

Most places have rules that require you to check MVRs on a regular basis. The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) suggests that any employee who has to drive a vehicle for work, regardless of if the employer owns the vehicle, should have an MVR report completed at regular intervals.

For employers who fall under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, they must review each driving employee’s MVR every 12 months. They must also keep the MVR on file for three years. This ensures employees keep their clean driving record throughout their time working with you.

How do I get a MVR report and how long does it take?

One Source can take care of MVR reports for you as an extension of our TotalCheck package. TotalCheck includes all the criminal history and identity checks you expect of any background report, and you can add a DMV driver’s history check or a Department of Transportation screening. You can also run a standalone driving history search on a recurring basis, or ad it as an extension of your TC package. We can help you decide what kinds of checks make the most sense for you depending on your job requirements.

At One Source, we take a lot of pride in producing thorough, accurate background reports quickly and efficiently. We strive for a turnaround time of 24-48 hours. The speed at which we can compile an MVR depends on the rules and operating schedules of your local DMV, but we generally get MVRs back in a less than a couple of hours.

To start hiring drivers with confidence, contact the One Source Client Relations Team and build your MVR process today.