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One Source Resource Review: January–March 2020

At One Source, we are dedicated to providing comprehensive, transparent and useful background check education and resources. We are screening industry experts, and we believe everyone should have access to a review of One Source’s resources to determine their security needs.

We will continue to curate blog posts and include them in this review of our website’s resources. We’ll categorize the blogs by topic and we hope these review posts will make it easier to find the information you need and utilize our knowledge when you need it. With that said, let’s dive into the One Source Resource Review.

General Background Check Information

5 Things You May Not Know About Background Checks

Ever wonder how background check agencies pull together a comprehensive criminal record? Or how to create a truly effective screening process? This blog delves into all the little details and questions you might have about the complicated world of pre-employment screening.

Employers’ Crash Course: The Fair Credit Reporting Act

Designed to protect the rights and information of job applicants, the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) carries immense influence. When followed properly, the FCRA can help you make informed hiring choices while protecting your candidates. If the FCRA is broken, however, it has the power to bring plenty of legal troubles to an organization. Stay aware of the FCRA’s guidelines with our handy guide.

How to manage 5 background check red flags

If you’re looking for a job right now, it’s totally understandable how the screening process could be confusing. Every different business may respond differently to the same background report. To stay prepared for any potential question about your background, it helps to understand how most organizations process screenings and what sticks out to them.

A guide to screening contractors and contingent workers

Contractors work on a temporary basis, so it can be unclear whether they should be screened like full-time employees. Contracting agencies do run background checks on individuals before they can join the agency, but it’s still impossible to know if those checks match your organization’s screening standards. In this blog, we discuss some rules about screening contractors and contingent workers to ensure you can hire provisional help with confidence.

Employers and Hiring Departments

9 Websites Your HR Team Needs to Bookmark

These nine websites for your HR team provide excellent resources to get quick updates on their field. Some analyze HR news, some break down ethical hiring practices and others have unique thought leadership to move your team forward. So, bookmark your favorites and help your team stay sharp!

3 Background Check Budgeting Tips

Even organizations that don’t typically set aside funds for screenings can make a habit of budgeting for compliant background checks. In this blog, we discuss how the cost of making an uninformed hiring choice can exceed the cost of screening an excellent hiring choice. Our background check budgeting tips will help you build a hiring budget that prioritizes screenings so your organization can keep security and quality hiring at the top of your mind.

Eight Key Considerations for Hiring a Background Check Agency

Not all background checks are created equal—and really, a background check is only as good as the company that provides it. However, you can minimize your organization’s risk by working with the right screening company for your particular business or industry. So, keep these eight questions in mind as you choose a screening agency to hire.

3 Ways Background Checks Improve Your Hiring Process

Want the best chance at making the best hire? Pre-employment background checks are the key to a successful, sustainable hiring process that will identify the ideal candidates for your organization’s future. And the pros of background checks go beyond hiring too—read on to discover three unique ways screenings could help your business.

What to Do Before You Run an Employee Background Check

Established companies and new businesses alike manage workplace safety and avoid risk to stay secure. Background checks are an excellent way to maintain that security. However, developing an effective screening system to run an employee background check is sometimes easier said than done. Regardless of where your organization is in its development, this blog can help you reflect on and hone your background screening practices.

How can I expedite my background check process?

One Source completes most background checks in 48 hours or less. You can count on us to do our part to keep your hiring process on track, but there are other variables that can be tougher to control. With these tips, you can effectively manage every part of the screening process so you can stay in your timelines.

5 vital insights from (pre) employment background checks

One Source’s team helps you decipher comprehensive reports, but there are a few indicators you can look for right away on any report. Therefore, you can immediately get a high-level understanding of an applicant’s history with five vital insights from our (pre) employment background checks.

Volunteer Organizations

Three essential background check tips for nonprofits

Often, nonprofits complete day-to-day work and fulfill their mission through the dedication of volunteers. When volunteers are so essential to your organization, they should be screened just like any paid employee would. You can make sure the people volunteering for you are representing your mission well by background checking them—and we can show you how to make the most of your screenings.

4 questions to ask about your volunteer background check policy

Before your organization starts recruiting volunteers, ask yourself how background checks fit into your recruitment process. You can ensure security for your organization and build a reliable volunteer base all while ethically screening your applicants. Find the best volunteers by considering these four questions about your volunteer background check policy.

That was just a review of One Source’s resources to determine their security needs. So, if you have any questions about background screening or how One Source can assist you, contact our Client Relations team.

5 vital insights from (pre) employment background checks

Background checks and references are some of the only insights employers have into who their applicants are. You can learn a lot about an applicant’s attitude and personality from an interview, but a background check offers an unfiltered report providing a clearer picture of an applicant’s past.

Screening reports contain a lot of information, so it can be tricky to determine what actually matters. One Source’s team helps you decipher reports, but there are a few indicators you can look for right away on any report. You can immediately get a high-level understanding of an applicant’s history with these 5 vital insights from (pre) employment background checks.

Employment Verification

An applicant’s resume will show you where they’ve gained experience over the years, but there’s no way to verify the authenticity of their resume without references. An employment verification will clearly show your applicant’s work history so you can be certain of their qualifications. You can establish right away whether their experience truly matches what you’re looking for.

Criminal Records

Every organization has different guidelines about hiring people with criminal records—be sure to make your expectations clear and stick to them. While not all screening agencies offer state and federal criminal checks, One Source’s TotalCheck packages screen county, state and federal court records plus sex offender registries and global watchlists. In a report, you’ll see an applicant’s full criminal record so you can easily determine whether their convictions are acceptable within your policies.

Education Background

Some positions require formal education or training, and you need to prove that your applicants meet the requirements. One Source can report what degrees an applicant earned, when they graduated, their GPA and whether the degree came from a degree mill. Degree mills are websites where people can buy degrees rather than complete coursework for them. Your candidates should have genuine degrees they studied for—a background report can tell you whether their education is valid.

Licenses and Certifications

There are hundreds of classes of professional licenses for a wide variety of industries. If your employees require any kind of professional certification, it’s up to you to ensure your team is completely licensed. A report from One Source will tell you what licenses a candidate has, when they will expire, any denied or revoked licenses and any disciplinary actions on licenses.

Driver’s History

A background report will help you determine whether a candidate is a good fit for a position that requires driving. One Source can tell you whether an applicant’s driver’s license is valid and if they’re certified to drive semi-trucks or vans. If an applicant has any tickets or driving infractions, that information will be provided as well. That was 5 vital insights from (pre) employment background checks that you can learn from. 

To start your hiring process with an experienced, helpful background screening partner, contact One Source Client Relations today.

4 questions to ask about your volunteer background check policy

Nonprofits, schools and plenty of other organizations rely on the services of volunteers to function. A strong volunteer base can be an organization’s greatest resource to help achieve its goals.

Before your organization recruits any volunteers, however, consider how background checks fit into your recruitment process. Screening volunteers ensures security for your organization and helps you build a reliable volunteer base. Find the best volunteers with these four questions to ask about your volunteer background check policy.

What screenings should we run on volunteers?

At a minimum, your organization should run a standard background check on every potential volunteer. One Source’s TotalCheck service includes checks of county, state and federal criminal records, the national sex offender registry, global watchlists and a verification of personal information.

Some volunteer positions may require screening beyond a standard background check. Take inventory of the roles and expectations for all of your volunteer positions to determine if you will need additional screening: Will volunteers need to operate a vehicle? Screen their driving record. Do your volunteers need any kind of professional training? Verify their education credentials.

Every volunteer opportunity is unique, so work with your background check agency to tailor screenings to each position’s requirements.

How often should we screen volunteers?

Dedicated, consistent volunteers are certainly an asset to any volunteer organization. However, periodically rescreening every long-term volunteer safeguards your organization and customers/clientele. It may seem tedious or intrusive to rescreen volunteers, but it’s the only way to ensure continued safety within your organization.

You do not have control over what your volunteers do outside your view, and the risk of misplaced trust could be detrimental to your organization. It’s always better safe than sorry, so try to rescreen your volunteers once a year.

How can we keep our volunteers’ reports secure?

Background checks can contain Personal Identifiable Information (PII), so it’s important to make sure that information is stored securely. One Source provides a secure portal for you to store, search and view completed reports.

Reports can’t be exported to your volunteer management system software, but One Source’s secure portal can work in tandem with your system to keep your volunteers’ information safe and organized.

What offenses would prohibit someone from volunteering?

Before you can decide whether to accept a potential volunteer, you need to develop consistent guidelines about how you handle volunteer rejections. Think about what infractions on a background report would be deal breakers for you. If your organization works with children, you may not be allowed to hire volunteers with any kind of criminal record. If your organization aims to help former convicts, your guidelines could be less strict.

No matter where you draw the line with volunteers’ backgrounds, just make sure your policy is relevant to the work the volunteers will do and never waver from it. Because of that, tart with those four questions to improve your volunteer background check policy. To find the best screening plan for your organization and to learn more about our offerings for nonprofits, contact One Source Client Relations.

One Source Celebrates National Consumer Protection Week

One Source The Background Check Company is celebrating National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW) March 2nd-6th, alongside government agencies and organizations nationwide. During this week, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)  focuses on helping individuals understand their consumer rights and protect their personal information. One Source is joining in to help employers and applicants understand what information a screening agency collects and how it’s used and secured.


What information is collected?

Two types of information is collected: Personally identifiable information and non-personally identifiable information. Personally identifiable information (PII) is just what it seems, any information that can identify you (such as your name, address, and IP address). It does not include statistical information. Based on your relationship with the screening agency, you may be asked to provide certain PII. Non-personally identifiable information (non-PII) cannot be used to trace the identity of an individual. It’s simply data that is anonymous.  Non-PII is usually collected by businesses to track and understand the digital behavior of their consumers.


Why information is collected and with whom it is shared?

Most information collected by a screening agency is for the purpose of screening an individual consumer. The background check is only done upon the request of a user who has a permissible purpose under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) to request information on that consumer. In cases of employment as a permissible purpose, the FCRA requires a user to certify to the screening agency that it has obtained the written consent of the consumer to request information before the requested screening information can be supplied.


How is the collected information used?

Our primary purpose in collecting personal information is to provide you with a safe, smooth, efficient, and customized experience. Personal information, such as date of birth and social security number, is never shared unless required to verify a record and then is only shared once the vendor has been fully vetted.

Learn about One Source’s Privacy Policy, including how information is secured and data retention here.

As a Consumer Reporting Agency (CRA), One Source and our clients must be aware of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). Check out for more tips for Employers’ on the Fair Credit Reporting Act here. More information is also available at http://www.ftc.gov/ncpw.

To learn more, contact One Source Client Relations.

How to manage 5 background check red flags

The vast majority of employers can’t afford to take applicants’ word for it when they say they’re trustworthy. It might seem harsh, but there’s too much at stake when hiring a new employee. That’s why up to 98% of businesses run background checks on all job candidates.

While job seekers may be familiar with the background check process, it can be hard to understand why different businesses look for different things on background reports. If you’re convicted of a crime or have a note on your record affecting your ability to do a job, you could be flagged by that company.

Businesses may respond differently to the same background report, so it can be helpful to know how certain aspects of your report may affect your job search. No one can really “fail” a background check, but a report can fail to meet the requirements of a specific employer. Inform yourself before your next job search with this guide on how to manage 5 common background check red flags. 

A Criminal Record

One of the most common screenings employers use is criminal background screening. This may be concerning to anyone with a criminal history, but employers must take the nature of a crime into consideration before making any employment decisions.

Some industries like security, education or elder care do want a completely clear record because employees will work with vulnerable populations. If an applicant’s conviction is not relevant to a job’s requirements, however, the majority of employers will give the applicant the chance to explain their record.

Credit History

In some cases, employers can see an applicant’s credit report as part of their background check. Generally, your credit history won’t impact your chances of getting hired. It will only if you apply for a job to manage the company’s finances or credit.

Driving Record

A few speeding tickets or parking infractions won’t be a red flag to most employers. However, not every business looks at applicants’ driving histories. An employer will likely only look at your driving record if you will need to operate a vehicle for the job. Be aware of your driving history if you know driving will be part of the job requirements.

Employment History

Background checks can show employers an applicant’s verified employment history with dates of employment, job titles and more. Therefore, it is in your best interest to be completely honest on your resume.

Drug Screening

Some businesses may require applicants to pass drug and alcohol tests before they can be hired. Many employees in civil service, public schools, road construction and law enforcement must pass drug and alcohol tests to work.

Applicants have lots of rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) to protect them at all stages of hiring. If you think you have been removed from consideration for a position unfairly, you are free to dispute your background report. That’s how to manage 5 common background check red flags. For more, reach out to One Source Client relations to learn about your rights under the FCRA.

A guide to screening contractors and contingent workers

Whether you’re a business owner in search of a consultant or a school superintendent looking to renovate, you’ll need to find and hire a contractor. Contractors, or contingent workers, follow a unique format of employment that depends on the expectations of those who enlist their services.

Since contractors are hired on a temporary, project-to-project basis, it can be unclear whether they should be subject to screenings like full-time employees. Contracting agencies often run background checks on individuals before they can join the agency. However, it’s impossible to know if those checks match your organization’s screening standards.

If you hire contractors, get in touch with a screening solutions provider that complies with the rights of contractors while still upholding your screening standards. Below we’ll discuss some rules about screening contractors and contingent workers to ensure you find the best contractor for your needs.

How should I handle contractor screening?

In order to decide the best background check process for contractors, think about the nature of your organization and what you expect of each contractor.

Some questions to consider as you outline your contractor screening policy include:

  • Is your organization regulated by any federal or state screening requirements?
  • Will the contractor interact with any vulnerable populations like children or the elderly while working on your property?
  • Could the contractor potentially have access to your organization’s sensitive information?

Determining the level of access a contractor will need and considering your industry’s screening regulations will clarify the kind of background check you should choose for contractors. When in doubt, follow the same screening policy you use for full-time employees. This ensures everyone working for you is screened equally and helps prevent discrimination claims.

What should I look for on a contractor’s background report?

At One Source, we provide simple, efficient contractor screening solutions to help you choose the right contractors for every job. It can sometimes be tricky to determine on your own what a background report really means, but we work with you to take the guesswork out of the entire process.

When you receive a certified contractor report from One Source, you will see if he or she does or does not meet our requirements. This way, you can quickly determine whether to hire a certain contractor. Your project will begin sooner and your organization remains safe with the contractor you choose. That’s just a beginning guide to screening contractors and contingent workers. 

To learn more about One Source’s contractor screening offerings, reach out to the One Source Client Relations Team.

9 Websites Your HR Team Needs to Bookmark

Human resources teams are the multitaskers, recruiters, coaches, cheerleaders and everyday administrators that keep companies going and thriving. While juggling payroll, benefits and hiring, they also need to keep up with news and trends in the HR industry. 

These nine websites your HR team needs to bookmark provide excellent resources to get quick updates on their field. Some analyze HR news, some break down ethical hiring practices and others have unique thought leadership to move your team forward. Bookmark your favorites and help your team stay sharp.

The Professional Background Screening Association (PBSA)

The PBSA is a trade organization that sets performance and ethical standards for background check agencies. They’re on the cutting edge of screening practices with plenty of resources and information for your hiring team. Check out their resources, education and accreditation tabs to learn how to choose an outstanding screening partner.

HR Bartender

Sharlyn Lauby, an HR consultant, is the friendly, welcoming voice of the HR Bartender blog. She fills her site with fun commentary, insightful opinions and thoughtful analysis of trends in the human resources world. Often, Lauby will answer reader questions from all perspectives of hiring and talent development. If you want enriching and educational content delivered with pizzazz, make a habit of visiting HR Bartender.

Fistful of Talent

The authors of Fistful of Talent take current events and uncover how human resources concepts appear in all of them. Their editorials offer approachable commentary and lessons about how to manage talent and grow teams.

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

While a bit more technical, the EEOC’s site has vital information for any hiring team. If you ever have a question about employment law or ethical hiring practices, you can check the EEOC’s publications page and peruse their variety of fact sheets. Basically, everything you need to know about equal opportunity employment lives on this site, even if you have to search a bit to find it.

Evil HR Lady

For off-the-wall, honest HR content with a pinch of sass, Evil HR Lady is your go-to blog. The writers aren’t afraid to tackle tough subjects with class and mundane topics with excitement. If you’re ever unsure how to handle a particularly difficult, weird or emotional HR situation, the answers are probably somewhere on this site.

TLNT

TLNT is a division of ERE Media, an online hub for recruiters. On the TLNT site, you’ll find professional news, analysis and opinions of the HR industry plus a daily e-newsletter and a curated feed of HR blogs from across the internet. So, TLNT is an all-in-one resource for everything talent and recruitment related.

Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)

SHRM stands as a key human resources trade organization with over 275,000 members around the world. They are thought leaders in the HR space with thousands of articles, reports and studies to inspire your team. Some content requires SHRM membership to view, but much of their best content is free.

BLR

One of the most unique features of BLR’s site is its comprehensive, easy-to-use search function. Therefore, they make it easy to hone down the exact topic and kind of content you need from their huge library of HR articles, presentations, quizzes and talking points. It’s especially useful if you need to find specific information about compliance or employment law.

One Source

Here at One Source, we have resources, blogs, FAQs, a glossary of background check terms and a responsive, knowledgeable Client Relations team. So, when you need background check guidance or hiring assistance, One Source will have your back and help create the best HR solutions for your team. Contact One Source Client Relations to learn more about our services and resources.

Three essential background check tips for nonprofits

Nonprofits exist to create good in their communities, and volunteers are the perfect vehicle for that good. They’re the face of many nonprofits—they interact with the public most and are what people remember about nonprofits. The roles of volunteers within nonprofits can vary widely too. Some can take long-term administrative roles, and some may work just a single event.

Regardless of how involved any given volunteer is in your nonprofit, they will make an impact on your audience. You need to be certain that volunteers will represent your nonprofit in the best light, so it’s a good idea to screen them.

Protect the people you advocate for and get excellent volunteers with these three essential background check tips for nonprofits.

Use more than one check

A simple criminal background check will clarify some aspects of a volunteer’s past, but it won’t uncover everything you’ll want to know. Identify the qualifications and traits you expect from your volunteers and choose screenings that will tell you exactly what you need. If your volunteers will operate vehicles, run a driving record screening on them. If your volunteers will work with children, check child abuse records or education credentials.

Make your application process streamlined

Those who apply to volunteer for your nonprofit are driven by a desire to make a difference. They want to help you as soon as they can, so a seamless application process will make it easy for them to start helping you and make the screening process faster. If you can send your applicants’ information off to your background check agency quickly, you’ll be able to get the best volunteers to work right when you need them.

Be aware of your risks

Budgeting is extremely important for organizations that don’t work for profit. While screening every single person who wants to volunteer may seem out of budget, there are background check agencies such as One Source that are happy to work with you and offer special nonprofit pricing. Build your budget to include room to screen the number of applicants you expect. Carefully spending on background checks will always be less costly than managing the fallout of a bad volunteer. It may take a budget adjustment, but it’s worth it in the long run.

That’s three essential background check tips for nonprofits, but it’s jus . To learn more about how One Source can help you get the best volunteers, contact our Client Relations Team.

How can I expedite my background check process?

When a position opens up at your organization, you want to fill it as quickly as possible so the new team member can start contributing their talents. Before you can select the right candidate and get them to work, however, your organization should vet each applicant with a thorough background screening process.

If you or your organization are new to the background screening process, you may be concerned with your screening agency’s timelines. Complete, accurate background reporting takes comprehensive work and should not be rushed, but that doesn’t mean screenings will slow your hiring process down.

One Source completes most background checks in 48 hours or less. We can provide the information you need to make informed hiring choices within your timelines. But if you need checks outside of the TotalCheck system or require services outside One Source, it can be trickier to estimate turnaround time. Regardless, background checks are meant to advance quality hiring, not hinder it. To expedite your background check process, prepare your applicants and team by doing the following tasks.

Have applicants provide relevant information up front

Be sure you can proceed with the screening process as soon as you have an applicant pool. In order to keep moving, get all the identification information you’ll need to run screenings from your applicants early on. Screening agencies may need addresses, educational degrees, past salary data and other information to build accurate reports, so ask for that information in the job application. When all of that data is in one place, you can access it easily and your background check agency can quickly get to work building a precise report.

Streamline your process using electronic signatures

With today’s paper-thin labor pool and low unemployment rates, eliminating paper from your hiring can speed up the process. At One Source, we offer applicant entry options which can be as simple as sending your applicant(s) a link, having them enter their personal identifiable information (such as full name, address, DOB and SSN). The applicant then signs the disclosure and authorization form electronically as well. The complete release attaches to the consumer report for your reference at any time. Applicant entry helps streamline your process and assist in hiring those that may be relocating for work or working remotely.

Understand the process of adverse action

Adverse action occurs when an organization refuses to hire a candidate because of the contents of their background report. If your screening agency’s search comes back with information that may lead you to eliminate an applicant from consideration, the agency will double check that the information is correct before including it in a report. This diligence is part of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) that protects applicants from potential inaccurate data that could hinder their job search. So, if your screening agency thinks a piece of information could make you take adverse action, they will take a bit longer to finalize the report to ensure you are fully informed and the applicant is treated fairly.

Make applicants aware of their screening rights

The FCRA gives several rights to job applicants to ensure background check agencies represent them legitimately. It is meant to make candidates more comfortable with the screening process and empower them to dispute incorrect reports. When your applicants are familiar with their rights, they will be more willing to cooperate with screening agencies. Your agency may reach out to an applicant to gather old pay stubs or diplomas to further verify their identity and speed along the reporting process. Make your applicants familiar with their FCRA rights and they may help accelerate your hiring.

To receive complete, fast and accurate reports with excellent customer service, reach out to One Source Client Relations.

What to Do Before You Run an Employee Background Check

Established companies and new businesses alike must manage workplace safety and avoid fraud to stay secure. Background checks offer protection and peace of mind as you bring new people into your organization. However, developing an effective screening system to run an employee background check is sometimes easier said than done. Regardless of where your organization is in its development, it’s worthwhile to reflect on your background screening practices.

In order to help your company reap the benefits of background screenings while staying compliant with consumer protection laws, make sure you complete the following before screening applicants.

Create a consistent screening policy

Work with your HR department to build a comprehensive hiring process that includes your background check procedures. You can create a flow chart of the proper steps to take and how to proceed in different situations.

Vague background check practices may cause your hiring team to treat applicants’ reports differently, which can lead to legal trouble. To stay consistent with the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), you must follow a strict process when taking adverse action—the removal of applicants from consideration because of their background report. So, if that process is already in your procedure, your hiring team will respond correctly.

Hire an FCRA-compliant, PBSA-certified credit reporting agency

The FCRA determines proper background check practices, and you must follow its guidelines to protect your business from negligent hiring charges. According to the FCRA, you need written consent from anyone you want to screen. And you have to explain your reasoning if you take adverse action. Under the FCRA, applicants have the right to know what information is in their report and they can dispute anything they deem incorrect.

Compliance is crucial, and the best way to guarantee a legal hiring process is to hire a reputable screening agency. Hence, the best agencies are FCRA experts that help you navigate its requirements with ease.

The Professional Background Screening Association (PBSA) determines the ethical and performance standards for the screening industry. So, if a consumer reporting agency has PBSA approval, it meets ethical standards and can be considered a trustworthy company.

See from the perspective of your applicants

Background checks are an increasingly common part of job searches. Applicants likely complete a screening for every job they apply for, and the FCRA empowers them to take an active role in the process. Your candidates will be familiar with the screening process and may have questions you should be prepared to answer.

Make sure your applicants feel comfortable asking questions, voicing concerns, seeking clarification and viewing their results upon request. Therefore, by preparing yourself to meet applicants’ needs, you’ll help them build trust with your organization and expedite the hiring process.

That’s the first steps in learning how to run an employee background check. Learn more about employment screening and how you can improve your hiring process by contacting the One Source Client Relations Team.